DANCE

DanceWatch Weekly: Inauguration weekend dance

Several big shows are on tap this weekend, including Tahni Holt at White Bird, BodyVox, Groovin' Greenhouse, and New Expressive Works

It’s an historic week for so many reasons, some happy, some frustrating, but here, we will focus on the happy and far less frustrating dance events in Portland.

Opening last night at Reed College’s Diver Studio is Tahni Holt’s Sensation/Disorientation, a White Bird commission that looks at femaleness and its layers in modern-day culture, will be performed in the round, by six multigenerational performers from 15 to 60 years old.

Sensation/Disorientation will be performed by Tracy Broyles, Muffie Connelly, Carla Mann, Eliza Larson, Suzanne Chi and Aidan Hutapea, with music by Luke Wyland, costumes by Alenka Loesch and dramaturgy by Kate Bredeson. Holt, within her choreography, investigates concepts of ritual, duration, exhaustion, vitality, and organic versus in organic, rupturing familiar cultural narratives around the female body specifically addressing age and weight.

For further insight into Holt’s process you can read Hannah Krafcik’s article, Reading into Tahni Holt’s ‘Sensation/Disorientation.’ Krafcik co-facilitates an ongoing movement practice with Holt at FLOCK Dance Center in North Portland and possibly offers a more intimate knowledge of Holt’s thinking and doing. You can also listen to OPB’s State of Wonder by Aaron Scott where he talks with dramaturge Kate Bredeson, musician Luke Wyland, Tahni Holt and White Bird directors Paul King and Walter Jaffe on the different aspects of the production.

Sensation/Disorientation was not intended to bookend the 2017 inauguration but works perfectly in that space anyway. Holt suggested in Krafcik’s article that we attend the Women’s March downtown and then head to her concert later in the evening. Sounds like a good plan to me.

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Eric Skinner’s happy landing

After two decades as a mainstay of BodyVox, the Portland dancer is ready to move on after this week's "Urban Meadow"

On the afternoon that Snowpocalypse struck Portland, Eric Skinner walked into the lobby at BodyVox Dance Center after a morning in the studio and settled easily onto one of the long couches in the corner. As always he looked trim and taut: small but strong and tough, with a body fat index down somewhere around absolute zero. If anyone looks like a dancer, Skinner does. Even in repose he seems all about movement: you get the sense he might spring up suddenly like a Jumping Jack on those long lean muscles and bounce somewhere, anywhere, just for the sake of bouncing.

His high forehead was framed by tight wiry curls, his eyes were quick and curious, his smile relaxed.

Or maybe not.

When BodyVox opens its new show Urban Meadow at Lincoln Performance Hall on Thursday evening, Skinner will be starting his final Portland run with the company he’s performed with since its beginning, close to twenty years ago. And where he’ll be landing, not even he knows. “I’m not quite sure what’s next,” he said, “but I thought that after nineteen years it was time to do something else.”

Erik Skinner. Photo: Michael Shay

BodyVox, the contemporary dance troupe founded by Jamey Hampton and Ashley Roland to create movement for a Portland Opera production of Carmina Burana, quickly spun off on its own. Based at first on Hampton and Roland’s experiences in the physical-theater troupes Momix, Pilobolus, and ISO Dance, it soon developed its own style, a blend of contemporary ballet, physical theater, and mime, whipped up with wit. Through all of its years Skinner, his partner Daniel Kirk, Roland, and Hampton have been the consistent members and most prominent faces. The current company is a vital blend of older and newer, the original quartet blending easily with a core of sharp younger dancers who’ve added fresh zest to the BodyVox style.

Skinner is 53, which would be very old for a ballet dancer but not necessarily for a contemporary dancer: If he can’t do everything he once did, he can do plenty, and with the benefit of more than thirty years’ experience built into his muscles and bones, he can dive deeply into the mysteries of movement. “As long as I make age-appropriate dances for myself … you can dance until you’re 90,” he said.

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Reading into Tahni Holt’s ‘Sensation/Disorientation’

The Portland choreographer shifts the burden of movement interpretation to the audience

​​By HANNAH KRAFCIK

On an unsurprisingly rainy and cold November night in Portland, I am sitting next to the heaters in a large dance studio, trying to keep warm while I wait to watch a rehearsal of choreographer Tahni Holt’s Sensation/Disorientation.

Lights are low and raindrops trickle down the inside of a drainage pipe in the corner, soon to be drowned out by the music of composer Luke Wyland, who has just finished setting up his equipment. Holt is preparing the dancers—Tracy Broyles, Muffie Connelly, Carla Mann, Eliza Larson, Suzanne Chi and Aidan Hutapea—to run through a section of the piece. “I’m not going to give any prompts, because I just want to see what happens,” she says.

I know Holt through the Portland dance community. We co-facilitate an ongoing movement practice at FLOCK, the dance center she founded and currently serves as Executive Director. I have had glimmers of insight into her creative process; yet, in this moment, I have no idea of what to expect.

“Let it go,” She tells the dancers. “I’m not interested in it looking super clean. Really get into it.”

Sensation/Disorientation could be said to offer a nuanced framework for witnessing and considering female-identifying bodies. If this does not make any sense, that is OK—just expect it to be a vivid dance experience that is entirely available for your own interpretation. Those who plan to attend the debut at Reed College, January 18-22, may do well to assume that Holt’s invitation—to let it go, to really get into it—also extends to audience members.

*****

Though Sensation/Disorientation has roots in Holt’s solo practice and previous collaborations, this dance was created after the venerable Portland dance presenter, White Bird, awarded Holt the Barney Creativity Prize in 2014. The prize, funded by the Dorothy Lemelson Trust and the White Bird/MKG Financial Group New Works Fund, commissions evening-length works that are included in White Bird’s season of performances.

Tahni Holt’s “Sensation/Disorientation”/Photo by Kamala Kingsley

 

White Bird’s co-Founders Paul Jaffe and Walter King spoke with me about commissioning Holt, whom they have been following since she began creating professional work 18 years ago. They look forward to what Jaffe described as “a different experience” for White Bird audiences.

“She [Holt] has always been true to her own voice [. . .] She is an artist that we feel is on caliber with any artist performing in North America or the rest of the world,” “We’ve co-commissioned 35 works in 19 years,” King added, “but in the case of Tahni, we’re especially excited.”

With the funding and faith of the most prominent dance presenter in the Northwest, Holt made the decision to hold off on presenting the commission for a year, which is why Portland audiences will see her new work this season. She also opted to present Sensation/Disorientation in Reed College’s Diver Studio Theatre, instead of Portland State University’s Lincoln Hall, traditionally used by White Bird for its Uncaged series. The Diver Studio offers the possibility of performance in the round, more appropriate for Holt’s dance than Lincoln Hall’s proscenium stage.

*****

Sensation/Disorientation emerged as a dance during Holt’s year-long collaborative process with a multigenerational cast of six female-identifying dancers (ages 15-60). Conceptually, the work has been steeped in her investigation of the material nature of bodies, their sensation, emotion, and feeling. Its origins also extend back to her time researching ‘70s-era feminist artists and their decision to incorporate activities generally associated with women in their art. “​Weaving, quilting, domestic life, labor, motherhood [. . .] all of these things became fodder for artistic expression,” notes Holt.

However, do not anticipate an exploration of any of these subjects in Sensation/Disorientation. “Womanhood” does not take center stage; female-identifying bodies do. This is an important distinction to make, and for good reason: “The piece itself is very permeable. It isn’t asking you [viewer] specifically to project something onto these bodies,” Holt shared. “It actually is insisting that you do whatever you do to them. And hopefully it holds up in a way that makes you reflect on why you do that.”

In my conversation with Holt, we also discussed how her work might sit in relation to the current socio-political climate. She reminded me that the piece debuts the week of the 2017 Presidential Inauguration and that audiences can even join the January Women’s March downtown and then attend Sensation/Disorientation later the same evening if they want. In the space of friction where identity politics rubs up against both individual and collective lived experience, Sensation/Disorientation may prove timely for considering such disorienting questions as: What do you see when you see what you see? And what does that say about how you think?

Tahni Holt’s “Sensation/Disorientation”/Kamala Kingsley

Or, maybe Sensation/Disorientation will do no such thing. Holt leaves the interpretation to the audience, and her work has historically opened itself to multiple readings of movement, sets, and costumes.

Holt is a native Portlander, and Sensation/Disorientation represents an exciting next step in her uncompromising body of work. When I asked Holt why she continued to create work in Portland, as opposed to basing herself in another city, she responded that, for a time, she had “​one foot here and one foot in other places.” Portland offered something vital to her early career, though: “​There was something about Portland that was generous enough, that truly allows me to fail, and I think that’s incredibly necessary for artists.”

“If you can find a place that allows you to fail,” she continued, “then you’re going to get to succeed sometimes.”

*****

Sensation/Disorientation will be presented as part of White Bird’s Uncaged 2016-17 Series, January 18-22, 2017, at Reed College’s Diver Studio Theatre.

Hannah Krafcik is a writer, dancer, and recent transplant from Brooklyn, New York, where she spent the past five years working in nonprofit arts and community-based organizations. She holds a Master of Art in Performance Studies from New York University, and her curiosities lie with the potency of artistic process. She has been an organizer and performer in Fleet Moves Dance Festival since 2011. Her research continues to be guided by the structures and depth of communities around her.

This story originally appeared on Artslandia.

Fertile Ground goes dancing

Portland's annual fringe festival has an expansive dance component, too

The Fertile Ground Festival of New Works and its dance-centric arm, Groovin’ Greenhouse, are right around the corner, January 19-29 to be exact. The 11-day festival that features new performance work in various stages of development, from the fully staged to workshops, in theater, comedy, dance and film, and everything else that doesn’t fit neatly inside those bins.

Fringe festivals, like Fertile Ground, can be found all over the world. The first one was the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, established in Scotland in 1947, as an alternative to the Edinburgh International Festival. The Fringe runs for 25 days and features a whopping 50,266 performances of 3,269 shows in 294 venues. (Portland choreographer Éowyn Emerald is a frequent performer at the Edinburgh Fringe.) Generally, fringe festivals show a range of work from amateurs to professionals. They are a non-curated, open forum for expression, and pose a low financial risk to artists and audience alike. What’s special about our Fertile Ground Festival, though, is that it shows only the work of Portland artists.

This past week, Arts Watchers Christa McIntyre, A.L. Adams and Bob Hicks attended the Fertile Ground’s meet-and-greet speed dating event, to learn as much about what this year’s Fertile Ground festival has to offer. According to Bob Hicks the speed dating event went something like this. “Theater people line up in front of a confusion of journalists from print, online, radio, and television outlets and work their way to the front, where they get five minutes to pitch their show and explain why that journalist really, really ought to see it and write very, very nicely about it. Then a whistle blows, and everyone moves on to the next encounter.” You can read their entire account of the evening here, as well as the terrifically descriptive list of the performances.

Here at DanceWatch I am just going to break down the dance offerings within the festival because, you know, I love dance and you probably do too.

The list below begins with independently produced Fertile Ground dance productions, followed by the Groovin’ Greenhouse schedule of performances with descriptions of each dance group or choreographer following. Groovin’ Greenhouse shows are shared by multiple performers in an evening.

Independent Fertile Grounds dance productions

Echo Theater Company in “Uncommon Sense.” Photo by Arnista Photography.

Uncommon Sense (workshop)
Featuring Echo Theatre Company, sister: grit collective, Tempos Contemporary Circus, and Sir Cupcake’s Queer Circus
Presented by Echo Theater Company
January 20-29
Echo Theatre, 1515 SE 37th Ave

Echo Theater Company’s creative director Aaron Wheeler-Kay, has brought together Echo Theatre Company, sister: grit collective, Tempos Contemporary Circus, and Sir Cupcake’s Queer Circus, to explore the multitudinous interpretations of the sensed world and find freedom within limitations, in an evening of politically driven, new works, combining circus arts, dance, narrative and physical theatre.

Featured performers with Echo Theater Company will be Portland dancers Yulia Arakelyan and Erik Ferguson, co-artistic directors of Wobbly Dance. You can catch a glimpse of them in rehearsal in Echo Theatre’s video trailer for “Uncommon Sense.”

“Last Dance”. Photo by Holly Wilmeth.

Last Dance
Written by Sky Yeager and directed by Jonathan Walters
January 19-29
The Headwater Theatre, 55 NE Farragut St. #4

Butoh artist Kat Macmillan, and actor Jaime Lee Christina, tell the story of an angel’s transformation into human form in this new play by Sky Yeager directed by Jonathan Walters. Through the modes of theatre, film, music and dance, the play touches on concepts of agency, spiritual purpose, life after life, and ponders the preciousness of life. Out of darkness, hopelessness, and despair, comes new life, hope and transformation. You can see a video preview of the work here.

“Into the night” by Allegro Dance Company. Photo by Casey Campbell Photography and Paul Pour Photography.

Into the Night: An Exploration of Life, Love & Loss
Performed by The Allegro Dance Company
Directed by Ashley López
January 28-29
BodyVox Dance Center, 1201 NW 17th Ave

Connecting aspects of ancient Middle Eastern culture to modern day ones, this collaborative, contemporary belly dance company of 15, directed by Tribal Fusion belly dance star Ashley Lopez, will examine the mystery, pain, and beauty inherent in the human condition through a visually rich, multifaceted, storytelling experience.

Groovin’ Greenhouse performances

Performance Dates and times

Portland Bellydance Guild, Polaris Dance Company, Polaris Junior Company, Neo Youth Company
7:30 pm January 20
Polaris Dance Theatre, 1826 NW 18th Ave

Les Watanabe, Polaris Dance Company, Polaris Junior Company, Neo Youth Company
2:00 pm January 21
Polaris Dance Theatre, 1826 NW 18th Ave

Les Watanabe, NW Fusion Dance Company, Polaris Dance Company
7:30 pm January 21
Polaris Dance Theatre, 1826 NW 18th Ave

Portland Bellydance Guild, Polaris Dance Company
2:00 pm January 22
Polaris Dance Theatre, 1826 NW 18th Ave

Vitality Dance Collective, Polaris Dance Company
7:30 pm January 27
Polaris Dance Theatre, 1826 NW 18th Ave

Polaris Dance Company, Polaris Junior Company, Neo Youth Company
2:00 pm January 28
Polaris Dance Theatre, 1826 NW 18th Ave

A-WOL Dance Collective and Polaris Dance Company and
7:30 pm January 28
Polaris Dance Theatre, 1826 NW 18th Ave

Breakdown of performing groups and premiering work

“Attention Everybody!” by A-WOL Dance Collective. Photo courtesy of A-WOL Dance Collective.

Attention Everybody! (excerpts), A-WOL Dance Collective
Through fierce, edgy, raw athleticism in the air and on the ground, A-Wol Dance Collective, an aerial/dance company, will knit together humanities commonalities, revealing our passion and energy and drive to serve the greater good.

Untitled work in progress by M’Liss Quinnly, Neo Youth Company
In its first season, Polaris Dance Theatre’s youth company for its youngest committed dancers will perform a new work by former Polaris dancer and Director, M’Liss Quinnly.

Untitled work in progress, NW Fusion Dance Company
Directed by Brad Hampton, this pre-professional dance company provides training and performance experience to help advanced dancers transition to professional careers.

Diverse-Divide (an excerpt) by Robert Guitron, Overcoming by Gerard Regot, Gravitation by Kiera Brinkley, performed by Polaris Dance Theatre
Guitron’s Diverse-Divide, speaks to diversity in the natural world and in politics. The movement explores the juxtapositions of the similar and the dissimilar. Guitron is the artistic-director of Polaris Dance Theatre.

Gravitation by past Polaris Dance Theatre company member Kiera Brinkley addresses her choice to change careers and the state of exhaustion. From 2011-2016 Brinkley was a Polaris Dance Company member and is a quadruple amputee. You can learn more about Brinkley’s story in the documentary Soar that came out in 2014 directed by Susan Hess Logeais.

Overcoming by Regot, a Polaris Dance Company member originally from Spain, explores ideas of disruption and loss. It attempts to capture the process of processing a loss and the difficulties in reaching out for help and moving forward.

Untitled work in progress by M’Liss Quinnly, Polaris Junior Company
Polaris Dance Theatre’s pre-professional youth company for its oldest committed student dancers, will perform a new work by former Polaris dancer and Director, M’Liss Quinnly.

Portland Bellydance Guild
Representing belly dancing styles from Folkloric/Traditional, Cabaret/Oriental, Tribal Improv, to Theatrical/Fusion, The Portland Bellydance Guild, a membership organization with a mission to increase public awareness and appreciation for dance and music, rooted in, or inspired by, the Middle-Eastern diaspora, will feature solo performances from Claudia and Jewels, a modern interpretation of women’s folk dance from the Arabian Gulf region using movement vocabulary informed by the seafaring traditions of the area by the newly formed troupe Amwaj, and an improvisational duet by Zephyr Bellydance that is created in the moment in response to the music, the dancers on stage and the energy from the audience.

Vitality Dance Collective. Photo by Will Mahoney Watson

Surrounding, Vitality Dance Collective
Vitality Dance Collective, a vision of Kristina York, was created for adults dancers who dance, but don’t have the time to dedicate themselves full time to the art. The company acts as a collective, supporting the choreographic vision of all its members, and enjoys being undefinable. They are about innovation, authenticity and fun.

Their new work Surroundings, is an exploration of life’s journey: where we’ve been, where we are headed, and what remains out of reach, and is only dreamable.

Love Songs, Les Watanabe
Inspired by the music of Cuban singer, songwriter and pianist Bola de Nieve, Love Songs, choreographed by Les Watanabe for four dancers ( Laura Stilwell, Felice Moskowitz and Terry Brock and Emma Mochnick), endeavors to capture love and its myriad of meanings and forms.

Leslie Watanabe is an Assistant Professor of Theatre and Dance at Western Oregon University and performed for Donald McKayle’s Inner City Repertory Company, Lar Lubovitch Dance Company, Joyce Trisler’s Danscompany, Alvin Ailey II, Burch Mann Folk Ballet, Sachiyo Ito Japanese Dance Company, L.A. Jazz, and Peter Gross Dance Company to name a few.

Other performances in Portland this week and next

January 18-22, Sensation/Disorientation, Tahni Holt Dance, Presented by White Bird
January 19-21, Urban Meadow, BodyVox Dance
January 20-22, Rent, Presented by U.S. Bank Broadway in Portland
January 20-29, Ignite, Oluyinka Akinjiola and Subashini Ganesan
January 24-25, BalletBoyz, Presented by White Bird

 

DanceWatch Weekly: Scanning a new year in Portland dance

The year's first DanceWatch starts with Éowyn Emerald and Dancers and a quick look at the next six dance months

Happy New Year dance fans and welcome to 2017!

Don’t get too comfortable hibernating in your winter dens because there is a lot to see, and you should see it.

Not only is the upcoming season already packed with dance works from local and international artists—including the premiere of Sensation/Disorientation by Tahni Holt, Urban Meadow by BodyVox, and  Fertile Ground’s Groovin’ Greenhouse hosted by Polaris Dance Theatre in three weeks—but a whole new group of Portland dance artists have just been awarded grants through the Regional Arts and Culture Council and PICA’s Precipice Fund, so watch out for those, too.

Éowyn Emerald & Dancers. Photo by David Krebs

The new year starts with a weekend of performances by Éowyn Emerald & Dancers. Portland choreographer Emerald takes her company to perform at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe every year and will be performing her latest Fringe festival concert at Reed College’s Greenwood Theatre.

The company, comprised of Éowyn Emerald, Mari Kai Juras, Josh Murry and Joel Walker,
will perform seven contemporary dance works that express a wide range of emotions while picking apart the complexities of human relationships. An apt performance to start the new year.

Oh, and Sunday the 8th is Free Dance Day at BodyVox, which means all dance classes are free, and you can even catch a glimpse of dance company Skinner/Kirk in rehearsal at the end of the day.

I have also put together Portland’s dance calendar from January to June for your planning convenience. If you see a performance missing from the list, just give me a holler at Jamunadasi@me.com and I will add it.

Performances this week!

Éowyn Emerald & Dancers-Fringe Coda
January 6-7
Greenwood Theatre at Reed College, 2903 Botsford Drive

See above.

Upcoming Performances

January
January 14-15, Increspature, Disorder Dance Company
January 18-22, Sensation/Disorientation, Tahni Holt Dance, Presented by White Bird
January 19-21, Urban Meadow, BodyVox
January 19-29, Groovin’ Greenhouse/Fertile Ground, Presented by Polaris Dance Theatre
January 20-22, Rent, Presented by U.S. Bank Broadway in Portland
January 20-29, Ignite, Oluyinka Akinjiola and Subashini Ganesan
January 24-25, BalletBoyz, Presented by White Bird
January 28, Nrityotsava-Indian Classical and Folk Dances, Presented by Kalakendra

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Snow Queen 5: Esprit de corps

Two dancers from Eugene Ballet’s corps de ballet seize their chance at the spotlight

Story and photos by BOB KEEFER

Editor’s note: Eugene arts journalist Bob Keefer is tracking Eugene Ballet’s creation of a new version of The Snow Queen.  ArtsWatch will repost the series here after each installment appears on Keefer’s Eugene Art Talk blog.

The hierarchy of traditional ballet divides dancers into principals – the stars of the show – and corps de ballet dancers, the ones who get the supportive roles. That’s not true of a small company like Eugene Ballet, which mixes corps dancers – which it calls “company dancers” – into top roles for many of its productions.

Two young company members who will be performing in the ballet’s new Snow Queen when it opens here in April are Sara Stockwell and Isaac Jones, both dedicated dancers at the beginning of promising careers.

Sara Stockwell and Isaac Jones

“What’s so great about Eugene Ballet is that being a small company, the company dancers can be highlighted in principal roles,” Isaac says. “Though there are some rankings, company dancers still do principal and soloists roles, and sometimes principals will be a part of corp work. (Artistic director) Toni (Pimble) really gives all her dancers opportunities to be in the spotlight, and that has really been a blessing. To experience corps work in some shows and soloist/principal roles in others has given me a lot of room to grow.”

With nearly a quarter million dollars in funding from the Richard P. Haugland Foundation and the Hult Endowment, the Snow Queen will be an all-new production, with a new score, created by Portland composer Kenji Bunch, new costumes, by Jonna Hayden, and new set, by Nadya Geras-Carson.

Both Midwesterners, Sara and Isaac each began their ballet training at what the dance world derisively calls “Dolly Dinkle” schools, which, to put it most charitably, means a small school that is more suited to recreational dancers than to aspiring professionals. Both young dancers are smart and ambitious, and both convinced their supportive parents that serious ballet study was more important, at least at this point in their lives, than college. And both, unusually, managed to land jobs in Eugene without an in-person audition.

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I met Sara and Isaac for coffee one morning last week to learn about their careers, their families and what they hope to do in Snow Queen. The pair of them were just back from a performance of EBC’s annual Nutcracker in Corvallis, and were headed out on the road again a few days later for 30 more performances around the West of the perennial holiday favorite.

A native of Rochester, Minnesota, Sara, 23, is beginning her sixth season with the ballet. The daughter of a computer programmer and a mother who home-schooled two children, Sara – at least by family lore – fell in love with ballet at the age of two when she happened to see Hans Christian Andersen, the 1952 Danny Kaye movie, on television. She announced right then she wanted to be a ballerina.

“I watched the movie again recently,” Sara said. “When I was two I must have been enamored by the costumes and sets; the spectacle of it all was enchanting and I wanted to be at the center of it!”

Sara begged her parents for ballet lessons until they finally enrolled her in a class that was half ballet and half tumbling. When she was 10 she was in her first “Nutcracker,” in the starring role of Clara. An experienced male dancer brought into the show saw her technique and suggested to Sara that she needed a better ballet school.

Two years later she auditioned for a professional intensive program at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in Manitoba – and was accepted – and then put the school off for a year because she thought, at 12, she was too young. At that point her parents asked which she wanted to do – college or ballet?

“I was like, ‘This!’” she said. They agreed to help her out with ballet.

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DanceWatch Weekly: Before the year ends, meet Katie Scherman

The dance schedule this week is busier than you might expect with "Nutcrackers," "Dancing With the Stars!" and other more experimental concerts filling the calendar

Happy Holidays, Happy Solstice, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. I’m saying all that now because this DanceWatch Weekly will be the last one of 2016. Here’s to a happier, healthier 2017.

But, before I go, I would like to introduce you to Portland dance artist Katie Scherman (2016 Alembic Resident Artist at Performance Works NW) who will be debuting Complicated Women, a work that explores the experience of being female, in all of its complexities. It opens Thursday night at Performance Works NW, Linda Austin Dance.

Scherman, who is originally from California, performed with Houston Ballet II, The Washington Ballet Studio Company, Trey McIntyre, Hubbard Street 2, Alonzo King’s LINES Ballet, Central California Ballet, Terpsicorps Dance Theatre and BodyVox to name a few, graduated from Alonzo King’s LINES Ballet/Dominican University with a BFA in Dance and received her MFA in Dance from the University of Oregon.

In 2008 she was nominated for an Isadora Duncan Award for Best Ensemble, and in 2009, she was honored with a Princess Grace Award in Dance.

Her choreography has been presented in Oregon, California, Colorado, Montana, Washington, Utah, and Chicago.

Scherman now lives in Portland, where she teaches, choreographs and performs. I was able to speak with Katie via email about her life in dance.

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