Weekend MusicWatch: Deja vu all over again

 

Oregon Symphony cellist Nancy Ives plays chamber music in Vancouver.

Oregon Symphony cellist Nancy Ives plays chamber music in Vancouver.

On Thursday, you can hear a major Ravel work for soloist and orchestra, a big Berlioz orchestra piece, and an excerpt from a famous opera. On Friday, you can hear a major Ravel work for soloist and orchestra, a big Berlioz orchestra piece, and an excerpt from a famous opera. The former happens at the Eugene Symphony’s concert at the Hult Center, which features Berlioz’s proto-Romantic “Fantastic Symphony” and Ravel’s Tzigane for virtuoso violinist (Danielle Belen) and orchestra, along with Saint-Saëns’ Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso” and the notorious “Dance of the Seven Veils” from Richard Strauss’s opera Salome;

That program looks a lot like what’s happening in Portland, and not just because Portlanders got to hear the Seven Veils during Portland Opera’s just-ended run of “Salome.” The Oregon Symphony’s Saturday and Monday concerts at Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall feature excerpts from Berlioz’s much less often heard choral symphony “Romeo and Juliet” (so we have a symphonie dramatique and a symphonie fantastique), and Ravel’s sparkling Piano Concerto in G, surely one of the 20th century’s most dazzling and fun classical creations, featuring pianist Inon Barnatan, who made a positive impression during his Portland Piano International recital last year, plus the ballet music from another Shakespearean setting, Verdi’s “Macbeth.”

That’s not the only case of apparent deja vu happening in Oregon music this weekend. As you already know from reading her ArtsWatch guest post, Thursday’s big Portland show, presented by Classical Revolution PDX, is Ashia & the Bison Rouge’s CD release concert at Alberta Rose Theater, where the Polish-born singer/cellist/songwriter will sing traditional and original Polish immigrant songs with help from her Vagabond Opera colleague, guitarist Robin Jackson, Lyrical Strings Duo, Lucia Conrad String Quartet, Andrei Temkin (from Portland’s brassy Balkan music party band Chervona), and other guests. They’ll do it again Friday night in Eugene at Sam Bond’s Garage.

One of my favorite concerts in 2011 was Cascadia Composers’ Crazy Jane affair, featuring music written by some of the organization’s female composers. I missed last year’s edition, but this year’s recurrence, “Crazy Jane Misbehaves,” happens Friday at Portland State University’s Lincoln Hall. It’s likely to be one of the most mischievous concerts of homegrown, original music this season, involving music for voices, piano, flute, didgeridoo, electronics, cello, clarinet and more, performed by some of Portland’s most accomplished musicians.

One of them, Vakarė Petroliūnaitė, is a member of another fab female foursome, the Julians, who’ll be breaking down the artificial barriers between classical and pop music as usual on Saturday night at Portland’s Shaker and Vine wine bar. They’ll sing music by Kodaly, venerable contemporary composers Einojuhani Rautavaara, Veljo Tormis and William Bolcom, Lithuanian composers, and also Bjork, Leonard Cohen, Tears for Fears, Alanis Morisette, John Lennon and many more. In another deja vu experience, the program resembles their show this past summer, where, despite the varied sources, these superb singers (drawn from the ranks of Portland’s top choirs) made it all sound natural, never like slumming.

Another Oregon soprano, Corvallis’s Janet Hackett, joins the  Salem Chamber Orchestra Sunday at Willamette University in the chamber orchestra arrangement of Mahler’s fourth symphony that composer Arnold Schoenberg  prepared for his early 20th century Viennese Society for Private Musical Performances. It’s a treat to see some of those small-orchestra versions, which Portland’s Martingale Ensemble have also performed and recorded (deja vu) recently, and SCO concert includes another, Debussy’s magical >Prelude to The Afternoon of a Faun.

Another superlative Oregon female musician, one of the state’s most valuable regardless of gender, is Oregon Symphony principal cellist Nancy Ives, a stalwart of concerts by FearNoMusic, 45th Parallel and other chamber champs. On Sunday afternoon, with musicians from the Vancouver Symphony (which is presenting the concert) and pianist Cary Lewis, she’ll play music by Faure, Chopin, Mendelssohn and other classical composers at downtown Vancouver’s recently reclaimed Kiggins Theater.

Speaking of singing, as we were a paragraph ago, you can get a head start on the usual year-end onslaught of choral concerts at Saturday night’s American Songbook show by Portland’s Satori Men’s Chorus at northeast Portland’s Central Lutheran Church, or Consonare Chorale’s concert at downtown Portland’s First Congregational Church. The weekend’s major choral concert happens Sunday at the University of Oregon’s Beall Concert Hall, where Oregon Bach Festival artistic director Matthew Halls pops over the pond from England to conduct UO singers and orchestra in Mozart’s great Mass in c minor and Benjamin Britten’s beautiful “Hymn to St. Cecilia,” in honor of the English composer’s centenary, along with fellow British composer Herbert Howells’s tribute to President Kennedy, “Take Him Earth for Cherishing,” commemorating the half century since his murder.

Cascadia’s last concert was a brassy affair, and there’s more heavy metal involved Sunday afternoon at Portland’s Old Church when the Solid Brass dodecatet (assisted by the Old Church’s 1883 organ played by Tom Skyler) plays music from the Renaissance through the ragtime era in a benefit for the valued venue.

Still another Eugene-Portland connection involves Seattle’s House of Tarab, which plays Arabic pop from the 1950s-70s on both western and Middle Eastern acoustic and electric instruments accompanied by belly dancers. They perform Friday at Eugene’s Cozmic Pizza and — deja vu! — Saturday at Portland’s Analog Cafe and Theater. And Saturday night at southeast Portland’s lovely Dance Mandal Vihara,  Portland sitar virtuoso and teacher Josh Feinberperforms with Kolkata tablawallah Angshubha Banerjee in a recital celebrating the release of Feinberg’s new CD. He also plays Wednesday night at Portland’s East India restaurant, and the Wednesday after that, and the Wednesday after that, and…

Want to read more about Oregon classical music? Support Oregon ArtsWatch! 

Oregon Symphony cellist Nancy Ives plays chamber music in Vancouver.

Oregon Symphony cellist Nancy Ives plays chamber music in Vancouver.

On Thursday, you can hear a major Ravel work for soloist and orchestra, a big Berlioz orchestra piece, and an excerpt from a famous opera. On Friday, you can hear a major Ravel work for soloist and orchestra, a big Berlioz orchestra piece, and an excerpt from a famous opera. The former happens at the Eugene Symphony’s concert at the Hult Center, which features Berlioz’s proto-Romantic “Fantastic Symphony” and Ravel’s Tzigane for virtuoso violinist (Danielle Belen) and orchestra, along with Saint-Saëns’ Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso”< and the notorious "Dance of the Seven Veils" from Richard Strauss's opera "Salome." That program looks a lot like what's happening in Portland, and not just because Portlanders got to hear the Seven Veils during Portland Opera’s just-ended run of “Salome.” The Oregon Symphony’s Saturday and Monday concerts at Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall feature excerpts from Berlioz’s much less often heard choral symphony “Romeo and Juliet” (so we have a symphonie dramatique and a symphonie fantastique), and Ravel’s sparkling Piano Concerto in G, surely one of the 20th century’s most dazzling and fun classical creations, featuring pianist Inon Barnatan, who made a positive impression during his Portland Piano International recital last year, plus the ballet music from another Shakespearean setting, Verdi’s “Macbeth.”

That’s not the only case of apparent deja vu happening in Oregon music this weekend. As you already know from reading her ArtsWatch guest post, Thursday’s big Portland show, presented by Classical Revolution PDX, is Ashia & the Bison Rouge’s CD release concert at Alberta Rose Theater, where the Polish-born singer/cellist/songwriter will sing traditional and original Polish immigrant songs with help from her Vagabond Opera colleague, guitarist Robin Jackson, Lyrical Strings Duo, Lucia Conrad String Quartet, Andrei Temkin (from Portland’s brassy Balkan music party band Chervona), and other guests. They’ll do it again Friday night in Eugene at Sam Bond’s Garage.

One of my favorite concerts in 2011 was Cascadia Composers’ Crazy Jane affair, featuring music written by some of the organization’s female composers. I missed last year’s edition, but this year’s recurrence, “Crazy Jane Misbehaves,” happens Friday at Portland State University’s Lincoln Hall. It’s likely to be one of the most mischievous concerts of homegrown, original music this season, involving music for voices, piano, flute, didgeridoo, electronics, cello, clarinet and more, performed by some of Portland’s most accomplished musicians.

One of them, Vakarė Petroliūnaitė, is a member of another fab female foursome, the Julians, who’ll be breaking down the artificial barriers between classical and pop music as usual on Saturday night at Portland’s Shaker and Vine wine bar. They’ll sing music by Kodaly, venerable contemporary composers Einojuhani Rautavaara, Veljo Tormis and William Bolcom, Lithuanian composers, and also Bjork, Leonard Cohen, Tears for Fears, Alanis Morisette, John Lennon and many more. In another deja vu experience, the program resembles their show this past summer, where, despite the varied sources, these superb singers (drawn from the ranks of Portland’s top choirs) made it all sound natural, never like slumming.

Another Oregon soprano, Corvallis’s Janet Hackett, joins the  Salem Chamber Orchestra Sunday at Willamette University’s Hudson Hall in the chamber orchestra arrangement of Mahler’s  Symphony No. 4  that composer Arnold Schoenberg  prepared for his early 20th century Viennese Society for Private Musical Performances. It’s a treat to see some of those small-orchestra versions, which Portland’s Martingale Ensemble have also performed and recorded (deja vu) recently, and SCO concert includes another, Debussy’s magical Prelude to The Afternoon of a Faun.

Another superlative Oregon female musician, one of the state’s most valuable regardless of gender, is Oregon Symphony principal cellist Nancy Ives, a stalwart of concerts by FearNoMusic, 45th Parallel and other chamber champs. On Sunday afternoon, with musicians from the Vancouver Symphony (which is presenting the concert) and pianist Cary Lewis, she’ll play music by Faure, Chopin, Mendelssohn and other classical composers at downtown Vancouver’s recently reclaimed Kiggins Theater.

Speaking of singing, as we were a paragraph ago, you can get a head start on the usual year-end onslaught of choral concerts at Saturday night’s American Songbook show by Portland’s Satori Men’s Chorus at northeast Portland’s Central Lutheran Church, or Consonare Chorale’s concert at downtown Portland’s First Congregational Church. The weekend’s major choral concert happens Sunday at the University of Oregon’s Beall Concert Hall, where Oregon Bach Festival artistic director Matthew Halls pops over the pond from England to conduct UO singers and orchestra in Mozart’s great Mass in c minor and Benjamin Britten’s beautiful “Hymn to St. Cecilia,” in honor of the English composer’s centenary, along with fellow British composer Herbert Howells’s tribute to President Kennedy, “Take Him Earth for Cherishing,” commemorating the half century since his murder.

Cascadia’s last concert was a brassy affair, and there’s more heavy metal involved Sunday afternoon at Portland’s Old Church when the Solid Brass dodecatet (assisted by the Old Church’s 1883 organ played by Tom Skyler) plays music from the Renaissance through the ragtime era in a benefit for the valued venue.

Still another Eugene-Portland connection involves Seattle’s House of Tarab, which plays Arabic pop from the 1950s-70s on both western and Middle Eastern acoustic and electric instruments accompanied by belly dancers. They perform Friday at Eugene’s Cozmic Pizza and — deja vu! — Saturday at Portland’s Analog Cafe and Theater. And  Saturday night at southeast Portland’s lovely Dance Mandal Vihara,  Portland sitar virtuoso and teacher Josh Feinberg performs with Kolkata tablawallah Angshubha Banerjee in a recital celebrating the release of Feinberg’s new CD. He also plays Wednesday night at Portland’s East India restaurant, and the Wednesday after that, and the Wednesday after that, and….

Want to read more about Oregon classical music? Support Oregon ArtsWatch! 

Oregon Symphony cellist Nancy Ives plays chamber music in Vancouver.

Oregon Symphony cellist Nancy Ives plays chamber music in Vancouver.

On Thursday, you can hear a major Ravel work for soloist and orchestra, a big Berlioz orchestra piece, and an excerpt from a famous opera. On Friday, you can hear a major Ravel work for soloist and orchestra, a big Berlioz orchestra piece, and an excerpt from a famous opera. The former happens at the Eugene Symphony’s concert at the Hult Center, which features Berlioz’s proto-Romantic “Fantastic Symphony” and Ravel’s Tzigane< for virtuoso violinist (Danielle Belen) and orchestra, along with Saint-Saëns’ “Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso” and the notorious “Dance of the Seven Veils” from Richard Strauss’s opera “Salome.”

That program looks a lot like what’s happening in Portland, and not just because Portlanders got to hear the Seven Veils during Portland Opera’s just-ended run of “Salome.” The Oregon Symphony’s Saturday and Monday concerts at Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall feature excerpts from Berlioz’s much less often heard choral symphony “Romeo and Juliet” (so we have a symphonie dramatique and a symphonie fantastique), and Ravel’s sparkling Piano Concerto in G, surely one of the 20th century’s most dazzling and fun classical creations, featuring pianist Inon Barnatan, who made a positive impression during his Portland Piano International recital last year, plus the ballet music from another Shakespearean setting, Verdi’s “Macbeth.”

That’s not the only case of apparent deja vu happening in Oregon music this weekend. As you already know from reading her ArtsWatch guest post, Thursday’s big Portland show, presented by Classical Revolution PDX, is Ashia & the Bison Rouge’s CD release concert at Alberta Rose Theater, where the Polish-born singer/cellist/songwriter will sing traditional and original Polish immigrant songs with help from her Vagabond Opera colleague, guitarist Robin Jackson, Lyrical Strings Duo, Lucia Conrad String Quartet, Andrei Temkin (from Portland’s brassy Balkan music party band Chervona), and other guests. They’ll do it again Friday night in Eugene at Sam Bond’s Garage.

One of my favorite concerts in 2011 was Cascadia Composers’ Crazy Jane affair, featuring music written by some of the organization’s female composers. I missed last year’s edition, but this year’s recurrence, “Crazy Jane Misbehaves,” happens Friday at Portland State University’s Lincoln Hall. It’s likely to be one of the most mischievous concerts of homegrown, original music this season, involving music for voices, piano, flute, didgeridoo, electronics, cello, clarinet and more, performed by some of Portland’s most accomplished musicians.

One of them, Vakarė Petroliūnaitė, is a member of another fab female foursome, the Julians, who’ll be breaking down the artificial barriers between classical and pop music as usual on Saturday night at Portland’s Shaker and Vine wine bar. They’ll sing music by Kodaly, venerable contemporary composers Einojuhani Rautavaara, Veljo Tormis and William Bolcom, Lithuanian composers, and also Bjork, Leonard Cohen, Tears for Fears, Alanis Morisette, John Lennon and many more. In another deja vu experience, the program resembles their show this past summer, where, despite the varied sources, these superb singers (drawn from the ranks of Portland’s top choirs) made it all sound natural, never like slumming.

Another Oregon soprano, Corvallis’s Janet Hackett, joins the  Salem Chamber Orchestra Sunday at Willamette University’s Hudson Hall in the chamber orchestra arrangement of Mahler’s  Symphony No. 4  that composer Arnold Schoenberg  prepared for his early 20th century Viennese Society for Private Musical Performances. It’s a treat to see some of those small-orchestra versions, which Portland’s Martingale Ensemble have also performed and recorded (deja vu) recently, and SCO concert includes another, Debussy’s magical Prelude to The Afternoon of a Faun.

Another superlative Oregon female musician, one of the state’s most valuable regardless of gender, is Oregon Symphony principal cellist Nancy Ives, a stalwart of concerts by FearNoMusic, 45th Parallel and other chamber champs. On Sunday afternoon, with musicians from the Vancouver Symphony (which is presenting the concert) and pianist Cary Lewis, she’ll play music by Faure, Chopin, Mendelssohn and other classical composers at downtown Vancouver’s recently reclaimed Kiggins Theater.

Speaking of singing, as we were a paragraph ago, you can get a head start on the usual year-end onslaught of choral concerts at Saturday night’s American Songbook show by Portland’s Satori Men’s Chorus at northeast Portland’s Central Lutheran Church, or Consonare Chorale’s concert at downtown Portland’s First Congregational Church. The weekend’s major choral concert happens Sunday at the University of Oregon’s Beall Concert Hall, where Oregon Bach Festival artistic director Matthew Halls pops over the pond from England to conduct UO singers and orchestra in Mozart’s great Mass in c minor and Benjamin Britten’s beautiful “Hymn to St. Cecilia,” in honor of the English composer’s centenary, along with fellow British composer Herbert Howells’s tribute to President Kennedy, “Take Him Earth for Cherishing,” commemorating the half century since his murder.

Cascadia’s last concert was a brassy affair, and there’s more heavy metal involved Sunday afternoon at Portland’s Old Church when the Solid Brass dodecatet (assisted by the Old Church’s 1883 organ played by Tom Skyler) plays music from the Renaissance through the ragtime era in a benefit for the valued venue.

Still another Eugene Portland connection involves Seattle’s House of Tarab, which plays Arabic pop from the 1950s-70s on both western and Middle Eastern acoustic and electric instruments accompanied by belly dancers. They perform Friday at Eugene’s Cozmic Pizza and — deja vu! — Saturday at Portland’s Analog Cafe and Theater. And  Saturday night at southeast Portland’s lovely Dance Mandal Vihara, Portland sitar virtuoso and teacher  Josh Feinberg performs with Kolkata tablawallah Angshubha Banerjee in a recital celebrating the release of Feinberg’s new CD. He also plays Wednesday night at Portland’s East India restaurant, and the Wednesday after that, and the Wednesday after that, and…

Want to read more about Oregon classical music? Support Oregon ArtsWatch! 

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