Oregon Children's Theatre Portland Oregon

Visual Art

Our visual arts coverage is made possible in part by support from The Ford Family Foundation’s Visual Arts Program.

For stories published before 2018, visit our archive site.

Frida Kahlo, off the conveyer belt

The secret to the Portland Art Museum’s exhibit on Kahlo, Rivera, and Mexican Modernism: Take it your own way, at your own pace.

Art Review: Birthe Piontek at Blue Sky Gallery

Piontek’s photographs explore the intricacies of family, love, and inevitable loss. The title of the exhibition, “Abendlied,” means lullaby or evening song in German, capturing the intimacy of the series.

Art on the Road: On (un)predictability

On a path from Germany to Southern Oregon, sculptor Christian Burchard goes with the grain as he collects, cuts, turns, and dreams the surprises in the wood.

VizArts Monthly: Spring reflections

Art on view in March includes quilts, photographs, installations, paintings, and films. Lindsay Costello previews the shows that will welcome spring around Oregon.

Henk Pander: Witness to the standoff

A suite of fiery paintings at the Oregon Jewish Museum goes face to face with the cultural clashes between police and protesters in downtown Portland.

Art Review: Pat Boas at Oregon Contemporary

Pat Boas’ abstract wallpaper and painting installation for the “Hallie Ford Fellows in the Visual Arts 2017-2019” exhibition at Oregon Contemporary captures Patrick Collier’s attention.

Art Review: Olivia Faith Harwood at Fuller Rosen Gallery

In the paintings in her debut show, “Possessions, Possessions,” Harwood weaves together chimerical forms, childhood memories, and mundane items pulled from everyday life to create emotionally resonant compositions.

Art review: Juan Santiago at Gambrel Gallery

71 porcelain princesses grace Juan Santiago’s exhibition “No Mirrors in this House” at Gambrel Gallery in Ashland. Though cast from a single mold, each figure’s appearance varies due to the mold’s inevitable degradation.

Ward Shortridge at Blue Sky Gallery

Ward Shortridge had a knack for capturing people authentically and generously. His photographs on view at Blue Sky Gallery showcase his ability to “see right into people’s hearts.”

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