Visual Art

Our visual arts coverage is made possible in part by support from The Ford Family Foundation’s Visual Arts Program.

VizArts Monthly: Nature, culture, and Indigenous viewpoints

August’s offerings draw inspiration from diverse areas of lived experience, a refreshing respite from the slow dog days of summer. Artists statewide will present works intertwining cultural storytelling, vulnerability, and the natural world. Hear vital Indigenous perspectives online at Five Oaks Museum,

Abundance under blacklights

Morgan Rosskopf and Manu Torres’s “Color Burn” at Well Well Projects celebrates maximalism and artificiality.

Amy Anderson, vice president of Alsea Bay Center for the Arts, prepares banners in her home studio for hanging in downtown Waldport. Photo by: Cheri Brubaker/YachatsNews.com

Waldport banners build community

Colorful banners hanging from downtown lamp posts are the Alsea Bay Center for the Arts’ first project.

"She Wrote Nothing At All," by Jamila Clarke (limited edition archival digital print, 10 by 12 inches)

Black art matters

In a Newberg exhibit, Black artists confront racism, as well as speak to the experience of being human.

Updating Ansel Adams

Laurel Reed Pavic reviews “Ansel Adams in Our Time” on view at the Portland Art Museum.

“Unlike engineering, where having a really good solution is important, in art the process is just as important as the solution,” says Shu-Ju Wang. . “Having a good solution is good, but there may be a hundred different solutions when you’re making art.” Photo by: Sankar Raman/The Immigrant Story

Exploring patterns of identity

Shu-Ju Wang’s art combines her interests in mathematics, her Chinese heritage, and the climate crisis.

European art and the baggage claim

The Portland Art Museum has had a European collection since its founding. What does it mean to exhibit European art in Portland in 2021?

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