Oregon

A plinth inside the sanctuary, “Dedicated in loving memory of Lincoln County based fishermen lost at sea since 1900,” serves as a base for photos, candles, and other remembrances of lost sailors. Many of the mementos were damaged in last month’s vandalism. Photo courtesy: Newport Fishermen’s Wives

Fishermen’s sanctuary weathers a different kind of storm

Vandalism has supporters wondering how to maintain public access while protecting the Newport memorial.

Sing a song of Oregon

An effort to remove offensive language from the state song could end up with dual anthems to Oregon.

LitWatch May: Oregon Book Awards

The Book Awards kick off a month of virtual events with Oprah, Whitney Otto, Stacey Abrams & Moby-Dick.

Joe Wilkins, a Linfield professor, is a finalist for a 2021 Oregon Book Award in poetry.

Joe Wilkins: ‘I’m always writing poems’

The Oregon Book Award finalist talks about poetry collections, the Western sensibility, and his love of chapbooks.

Ann Vileisis's book, "Abalone, The Remarkable History and Uncertain Future of California’s Iconic Shellfish," has been nominated for an Oregon Book Award

Freewheeling iridescence of the abalone

Port Orford author Ann Vileisis has been nominated for an Oregon Book Award for her book on the shellfish.

Fused glass artist Ann Cavanaugh and glass blower Andy Nichols combine their talents in glass fish.

Like a fish out of fire

Two glass artists in Cannon Beach’s Spring Unveiling Arts Festival collaborate to make finned figures.

Ashland Film Festival celebrates the power of young people

Streamers: The indie fest rolls out a virtual and live-event 20th season with a lineup strong on documentaries.

The story of a man and his dog

Pacific City author Ben Moon’s memoir, “Denali,” is a finalist for an Oregon Book Award.

Bruce MacGregor photographed Larry on Sept. 20, after his Otis home was destroyed in the Echo Mountain fire, then looted. Photo by: Bruce MacGregor

From ashes of the Echo Mountain fire, art

The Lincoln City Cultural Center gathers photography and items culled from the rubble of last fall's fire near Otis.

“Sophia’s Garden” by Lisa Brinkman (eco-prints of sumac, eucalyptus, and maple on raw silk canvas, cold wax and oils, 30 by 30 inches)

Lisa Brinkman: ‘A collaboration of life with Nature’

The artist’s eco prints, at the Chehalem Cultural Center, are an earthy mix of abstraction, symbolism, and collage.

Marilyn Karr, here with her border collie Journey, plays two roles in “The Dog Logs”: Savoir Faire, a single-minded greyhound, and Maddie, a golden retriever, who finds life, especially boy dogs, strange. Photo courtesy: Riverbend Players

Riverbend Players goes to the dogs

After a quiet year, the Nehalem theater company is back with a play in which all the characters are canine.

LitWatch Monthly: It’s National Poetry Month

April marks National Poetry Month – along with eight of the most exciting ways for you to celebrate.

Beverly Cleary: Plucky, adventurous kids can be fun!

Beverly Cleary reminded America that adventurous children weren't transgressive—they were fun! Especially on Klickitat Street.

In pre-COVID days, Ketzel Levine (far right) leads a discussion in the Wonder Garden. She says the garden has become the No. 1 gathering place in Manzanita for people who wanted to get together in masks. Photo courtesy: Ketzel Levine

Pulling back the curtain on Manzanita’s Wonder Garden

The Hoff Online program celebrates Manzanita Day with a talk by Ketzel Levine.

Spring awakenings in Yamhill County

The pandemic thaw continues, with a lecture by Trystan Reese, music, visual art, and a camillia fest.

Yachats Celtic Fest plans for fall

The music fest, which lost its 20th season last year to the pandemic, plans to start again in '21 – if restrictions are eased in time.

“Indifference,” by Aron Johnston (oil on linen panel, 48 by 36 inches, 2018), was inspired by the 2017 fire set by teens that burned 50,000 acres in the Columbia River Gorge.

Pictures worth more than a thousand words

A narrative art exhibit at the Chehalem Cultural Center tells stories that “provide insight into the human condition.”

Jacob Elshin (born St. Petersburg, Russia, 1892; died Seattle, 1976), “Miners at Work,” (1937-38, oil on canvas, 5 by 12 feet), collection of the City of Renton, Washington, courtesy of U.S. Postal Service. ©2019 USPS. Photo courtesy: Hallie Ford Museum of Art

Remembering ‘Forgotten Stories’ of the Great Depression

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art exhibits 70 pieces produced by Northwest artists during the New Deal.

Yuritzi Cuellar-Pacheco (left) and Gage Koceja, both Taft High School seniors

Seeing the self through the gray rectangle of Zoom

Lincoln City students blend art with technology to create self-portraits during a year of virtual learning.

“Two Different Kinds of Love,” by Alyce Vest, won the Best First-Time Filmmaker Award.

And the winner is… the McMinnville Short Film Festival

Last month’s all-virtual festival receives rave reviews, and we tell you which films took home the honors.