David Park

Kill a painting, save a world

Like Banksy, Portland's Elisabeth Jones Art Center plots to destroy a painting. Unlike Banksy, its goals are global and environmental.

On November 1, the day after Halloween and roughly three weeks after the titillating shredding of the Banksy painting Girl With Balloon during an auction at Sotheby’s in London, a large blue and green painting will be destroyed at the Elisabeth Jones Art Center. The painting, Danger, Little One, features a large pair of bears in the polar lights looming over a small polar bear on a melting ice floe. It faces a grisly ending: It’ll be pierced, jabbed, sanded, attacked with power tools that whine like dentists’ drills, smashed to smithereens.

Banksy see, Banksy do? To be fair, the Portland art center got there first.

“Danger, Little One”: to be terminated November 1.

In early August, two months before The Shredding That Shook The Art World (although Banksy had planned it earlier), the Elisabeth Jones center had destroyed another large painting, Peaceable Kingdom, which also depicted polar bears, these ones swimming happily along with fish and sea mammals in a dream of non-imperiled status. And John Teply, the center’s director, has done this sort of thing before. In the 1980s, in Santa Cruz County, California, he created a 30-foot-long outdoor painting, Wingspread, and then had it bulldozed as onlookers watched, aghast.

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