Deborah Horrell

2018: A roller-coaster arts ride

Baby 2019's raring to get rolling. But first, a stroll down memory lane with Old Man 2018 and his slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.

Well, that was the year that was, wasn’t it? Old Man 2018 limps out of the limelight with a thousand scars, a thousand accomplishments, and a whole lot of who-knows-what. The new kid on the block, Baby 2019, arrives fit and sassy, eager to get rolling and make her mark. She’s got big plans, and the ballgame’s hers to win, lose, or draw.

New kid on the block: 2019 rolls into the picture, fit and sassy and ready to start fresh. (Claude Monet, “Jean Monet on His Hobby Horse,” 1872, oil on canvas, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.)

On the Oregon arts and cultural scene, 2018 entered the game with similar high hopes and then handled a lot of unexpected disruption, holding his ground and even making a few gains even as his hair grew thin and gray. He can retire with his head held high, if he’s not too busy shaking it from side to side over the things he’s seen.

Continues…

Artist Deborah Horrell, 1953-2018

The longtime Portland artist dies after a long battle with cancer. A celebration of her life has been set.

Deborah Horrell, 1953-2018. Photo courtesy Elizabeth Leach Gallery

Word has arrived that the longtime Portland artist Deborah Horrell died on August 24 after a six-year battle with lung cancer. She was 65. Her obituary is here.

“It is with heavy hearts that we inform you that our dear friend and gallery artist, Deborah Horrell, recently passed away after several years battling cancer,” her Portland gallery, Elizabeth Leach, announced. “Deborah was a beloved member of the gallery family and larger arts community, known for her dynamic and meticulously crafted works in glass, wood and ceramics, as well as her masterfully drafted drawings and paintings.

“Many of you may know that during the last 18 years Deborah had several periods fighting cancer. She always brought tenacity, immense strength and dignity to this herculean task. During those challenging years, Deborah deepened her infectious love for life, boundless affection for friends, colleagues and collaborators, expanded her witty sense of humor, and her passion for imaginative and creative fashion. Deborah dedicated her time to her family (husband Kit and dog Kenai), her studio art practice and giving back to her community. She served on the board of PICA: Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, participated in art residencies and major exhibitions around the country and was an ever-present and engaged patron and attendee of art and dance events throughout our community.”

A celebration of her life will be held October 6 at PICA, 15 N.E. Hancock Street. Details are here.