DNA: Oxygen

Women on the move: These are the days, again

ArtsWatch Weekly: History moves into the forefront, a new series on Indigenous resilience, it's film fest time, a month of culture

ON SATURDAY THE DOOR BETWEEN THE PAST AND PRESENT CREAKS OPEN JUST A LITTLE BIT: After months of coronavirus shutdown and a couple of bouts of vandalism during protests in the South Park Blocks, the Oregon Historical Society reopens its downtown Portland center to visitors on a limited basis, joining such other Oregon museums and historical sites as Salem’s Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Bend’s High Desert Museum, the Grants Pass Museum of Art, and Portland’s Pittock Mansion, which has also just reopened on a limited basis. The historical society will be open noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays until further notice: Know the rules before you go

Abigail Scott Duniway voting for the first time, May 5, 1913, in Portland. The sister of Harvey Scott, the conservative editor of The Oregonian, she was a leading early suffragist and his political foil. Photo: Oregon Historical Society

MARCH IS WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH, and one of the big exhibits you’ll find at OHS is Nevertheless, They Persisted: Voting Rights and the 19th Amendment, which tells the story of the fight by women to win the right to vote. One of the movement’s prime figures in Oregon was Abigail Scott Duniway, a Portland suffragist and the sister of the stolidly conservative Harvey Scott, longtime editor of The Oregonian, whose statue in Mt. Tabor Park was torn down from its pedestal in October and recently, in a mysterious guerrilla art action, replaced by a handsome bust of York, the Black man who was a slave of William Clark and traveled with Clark and Meriwether Lewis on their expedition to the Pacific Ocean in 1805. Among other things, Scott was a steadfast opponent of women’s suffrage. Sometimes, what goes around comes around.

Continues…

Spotlighting the lives of Black Portlanders in the pandemic

The short film "See Me," the first project from Artist Rep’s DNA: Oxygen, is premiering at the Portland International Film Festival

During the climax of Artist Repertory Theatre’s new short film See Me, CL (Treasure Lunan), an agoraphobe, imagines stepping through their front door.

“CL has a glimpse of what it’s like to be outside without worrying,” says Kisha Jarrett, a writer and an executive producer on the film. “To have the pressure on you of not feeling like you can do that and then throw on a pandemic and then throw on that Black people are dying, that is a lot … when you’re trying to walk out of the door.”

Treasure Lunan in a still from the film “See Me.”

See Me, which is premiering virtually on Friday, March 5, at the Portland International Film Festival, chronicles the lives of three Black Portlanders surviving the pandemic. It’s a movie for this moment (it is haunted by the protests that swept Portland in the wake of George Floyd’s murder), but it is as personal as it is universal. The film’s characters face racism and micro-aggressions, but they also battle mundane evils like interminable Zoom meetings and burnt toast.

Continues…