Michelle Maida

Love, loss, & frocks to die for

An Ephron comedy at Triangle Productions celebrates women's bonding and the fine art of stitching fashion into the passages of life

A good piece of theater transports you to a different place, and in the case of Love, Loss, and What I Wore, the sentimental comedy by Nora and Delia Ephron that’s traipsing the metaphorical runway at Triangle Productions, that place is a walk-in closet or a department-store dressing room. The Ephrons’ tale is overflowing with skirts, sweaters, bras, robes, dresses from party to wedding, lipstick, hairdos, shoes/boots/flats/heels – even, if I remember right, a brief constricting fling with that antique instrument of torture, the girdle. It’s a fashion bonanza of a theatrical parade, delivered with a wink and an almost-audible whisper: Try it on. You’ll like it.

All for one, one for all: from left, Michelle Maida, Rebecca Wells, Olivia Weiss, Lisamarie Harrison, Trish Egan. Photo: David Kinder/kinderpix

Theatrical transit’s a good and valuable thing, but as someone whose ordinary concession to the dictates of fashion is a pair of L.L. Bean comfort-waist jeans and a 20-year-old all-purpose Pendleton shirt whose elbows have tragically worn through, I felt a little like a stranger in a strange land, wandering in a world not my own.

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Brief affair, puzzling twist

Triangle's intimate, beautifully performed family story "Our Mother's Brief Affair" jumps the expositional tracks, and it's difficult to care

By ALIA STEARNS

Children view their parents as sexless creatures, even though a child’s entire existence is the product of raw parental sexuality. And, it is mothers more often than fathers who are placed on a rigid, unearned pedestal of purity and selflessness by their offspring. In Our Mother’s Brief Affair, at Triangle Productions, author Richard Greenberg explores the life of Anna (Michelle Maida), a mother who is neither selfless nor pure, and her relationship with her twin children, Seth (Alex Fuchs) and Abby (Deanna Wells).

Deanna Wells, Alex Fox, Twig Webster, Michelle Maida: intimate mysteries. Photo: David Kinder/Kinderpics

Anna steps onto the stage before the lights go low, sitting on one of the two benches that make up the entirety of the set and occupying herself quietly as the audience continues murmuring pre-theater chatter. When Seth steps on the stage, he launches into the first of the night’s bouts of exposition. An obituary writer by trade, he has trouble fully capturing his mother as he has come to know her. She isn’t a cold woman, exactly, but she also isn’t the sort prone to affectionate behaviors like assigning nicknames to her children. Anna is also what Seth terms “an average situational liar but not at all a maker of fables.”

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