Vali Phillips

Classical Up Close 8: Emergency

Pianist Cary Lewis has a "critical heart incident" in mid-concert and is carried away by ambulance to a hospital, where he undergoes emergency surgery

UPDATE: Cary Lewis was diagnosed with an aortic dissection – a tear in the inner layer of the large blood vessel leading to the heart – and underwent emergency open-heart surgery. On Tuesday he was still in the hospital’s intensive care unit, but was also able to sit up in a chair.

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The high-powered trio of violinist Sarah Kwak, violist Vali Phillips, and pianist Cary Lewis on keyboard was deep into the opening piece of Friday afternoon’s 12th concert in Classical Up Close’s June series of 14 free outdoor shows when something went wrong. Lewis, the veteran and highly regarded classical pianist, was in pain.

“I was sitting right next to the stage in case the wind blew Vali’s music off his stand,” Nancy Ives, the principal cellist of the Oregon Symphony Orchestra and a co-founder of Classical Up Close, said the following morning. “I could see that Cary was having problems with his right hand.” She thought it was a flareup from an old climbing injury that sometimes still causes him problems. “And then I heard him say, ‘I can’t even quite lift my right arm’.”

Something was very wrong. “Real life, you know, gets in there,” Ives said. The music stopped. Somebody called an ambulance, which rushed Lewis off to the hospital. Everyone, fellow musicians included, was stunned. “It’s just surreal,” Ives said. “Here you have a friend having a crisis, and you don’t even know. I just know without asking, Cary had that ‘the show must go on’ thing. He is a trouper among troupers.”

Lewis is reported to have had “a critical heart incident” and was taken into emergency open heart surgery. A report on Saturday from a friend of the family said that “it seems that they have been able to manage the situation.”

Pianist Cary Lewis and his wife, cellist Dorothy Lewis. Photo via Facebook. The Lewises were founding members of the Lanier Trio, and Cary has remained in demand as an accompanist for solo performers and as a pianist in chamber groups. He’s been a frequent festival musician across the country. Here’s a review of his 2019 duo concert in Hawaii with Martin Chalifour, principal concertmaster of the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

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Making music in a time of isolation

As the world shuts down and the Oregon Symphony faces a stark financial crisis, musicians create a series of mini-concerts from home


PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOE CANTRELL
STORY BY BOB HICKS


AS AN ODD AND NERVOUS QUIET SETTLED over greater Portland and most other places from coast to coast in the past several days, small islands of sound broke the spell, scattered here and there like grace notes or staccato exclamations. They were counter-ripples against a tide of silence, little bursts of defiant pleasure, sounding carefully yet emphatically: Even in a time of plague, the music would not die.

These small musical uprisings were especially compelling considering the Oregon Symphony Orchestra’s announcement last Friday that it was suspending its current season, which was to run into June, and laying off its 76 contracted musicians, along with 19 staff members and two conductors. The situation, symphony President and CEO Scott Showalter told The Oregonian/Oregon Live, is dire. “We need emergency funds now,” he told reporter Nathan Rizzo. “What we’re staring down between now and the end of June is a $5 million loss.” Showalter had written to Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, Rizzo added, urging state economic support for the orchestra as the coronavirus crisis takes its toll, and the symphony is actively seeking private funds as well. The danger of collapse, it seems, is very real. And the orchestra is not alone. Across Oregon and the nation, cultural groups of all sorts are staring nervously into what seems a daunting economic abyss.

An invitation to the neighborhood: come close, stay apart, join us at a distance as we make some music.

So on Friday through Sunday, in what was not quite a coincidence, a large handful of those recently furloughed symphony musicians went small. In Portland and its surrounds, seven musical mini-events took place, on musicians’ porches and in their yards, at neutral neighborhood gathering spots where listeners and players alike could keep their social distance and yet also be together, sharing something both sophisticated and elemental: the joy of music.

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