Zakir Hussain

MusicWatch Monthly: American mestizaje

Caroline Shaw, nyckelharpa and hardanger fiddle, Carnatic voice and violin, harps and drums, and American gothick

As we said a few weeks ago, American musical culture–whether we define “American” as USA, North America, or the entire New World–is above all immigrant musical culture. This seems to hold true for a broad interpretation of “immigrant” which includes, at the very minimum: Puritans and other English-speaking immigrants, with their blend of English, Irish, Scottish, and European traditions; abducted Africans with their own blend of classical and folk traditions; indigenous Peoples across North and South America who found their musical cultures decimated, consumed, and alienated by the arrival of Wendigo; and the successive waves of cultures pouring out of war-torn regions across the world, from Italy and Russia to India and Japan, all bringing their cultures with them and adding to the great and glorious New World Melting Pot.

To be fair, there’s another word that covers all this melting pottedness, and we’d like to follow Gabriela Lena Frank’s lead and adopt a term she borrowed from Peruvian anthropologist José María Arguedas: mestizaje. So let’s go all out and say that American culture is mestizaje culture. Sound good? Great!

The week ahead

Of all the living traditions that thrive in fair Oregon, the one we most enjoy paying attention to is the Contemporary Classical Tradition. We just love the way contemporary composers–like Portland’s David Schiff and this month’s guest star Caroline Shaw–tend the gardens of American Classical Music by embracing both the musicks of their predecessors and the distinctly mestizaje aspect of American culture. (Read more about Shaw and Schiff here and here).

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Oregon Music 2018: looking outward

Socially engaged sounds, multimedia productions, and other trends in 2018 Oregon music

Last year’s music roundup first looked homeward. ArtsWatch’s 2017 music coverage focused, as we have from the outset, on our state’s creative culture: music conceived and composed in Oregon. We touched a lot of other bases, too of course, and homegrown music remained a touchstone our 2018 coverage and this recap.

But as with other Oregon artists this year, Oregon music increasingly gazed outward — and often askance — at our nation’s continuing descent into turmoil, division, lies, and political corruption, starting right at the top and oozing down. Therefore, so did much of our music coverage. So we’ll start with what ArtsWatch’s David Bates called…

“Socially Engaged” sounds

Portland new music ensemble FearNoMusic and choir Resonance Ensemble devoted entire seasons to contemporary classical music that responds to today’s social issues.

Resonance Ensemble preview: questions of faith
Choral organization’s ‘Souls’ concert is part of a season-long musical exploration of timely social concerns
Brett Campbell, February 23

‘Bodies’ review: Pride is a verb
Resonance Ensemble’s Pride Week concert commemorates LGBTQIA community’s struggles and celebrates its creativity.
Matthew Andrews, August 14

Resonance Ensemble

Resonance Ensemble: amplifying ‘Hidden Voices’
Vocal ensemble’s collaborative concert features musical responses to experiences marked by racism and resistance.
Matthew Andrews, November 17

Fear No Music: music of migration and more
New music ensemble demonstrates dedication to diversity and development.
Matthew Andrews, December 10

New music ensemble Fear No Music

Other classical music organizations also presented issue-oriented new music.

Oregon Symphony reviews: immigrant songs
Fall concerts include a world premiere theatrical commission and 20th century works by immigrant American composers
Matthew Andrews, January 9

Lawrence Brownlee preview: a journey
In a Friends of Chamber Music recital, the celebrated tenor sings a Romantic classic and a new, timely composition about America’s most pressing crisis
Damien Geter, April 2

Shredding it at “Pass the Mic” camp.

Portland Meets Portland
The innovative “Pass the Mic” summer music camp pairing music pros and young refugees and immigrants will give a free concert Friday.
Friderike Heuer, July 14

David Ludwig: telling the earth’s story through music
Composer’s Chamber Music Northwest commission inspired by ancient Earth, threat of extinction from human-caused climate change.
Matthew Andrews, July 27

Gabriel Kahane’s new oratorio confronts America’s empathy deficit
Commissioned, performed and recorded this week by the Oregon Symphony, ’emergency shelter intake form’ humanizes homelessness.
Interview by Matthew Andrews, August 28

Multimedia

Besides addressing today’s social issues, another trend among some classical music organizations in 2018 was updating their presentations by augmenting music with other art forms such as theater, literature, visual arts, and more. At ArtsWatch, we try to provide constructive feedback on how these often experimental productions worked, so we can help risk-taking artists move forward into unexplored territories — without leaving the audience behind.

Fin de Cinema’s “Beauty and the Beast”: spirit of discovery
Latest mix of classic film and Portland contemporary music captures Cocteau creation’s mix of beauty and grit.
Douglas Detrick, January 23

Portland Youth Philharmonic’s Cappella PYP, Portland State choirs, and In Mulieribus perform Richard Einhorn’s ‘Voices of Light’ during a screening of Dreyer’s film Friday.

‘Voices of Light’ preview: trial by fire
Camerata PYP, In Mulieribus, Portland State University choirs perform Richard Einhorn’s popular oratorio ‘Voices of Light’ with Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film ‘The Passion of Joan of Arc.’
Brett Campbell, January 25

“Tesla” lab report
Harmonic Laboratory’s ambitious experimental multimedia performance produces mixed results.
Brett Campbell, February 6

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Zakir Hussain & Rakesh Chaurasia preview: a conversation in concert

Kalakendra brings one of the world's greatest percussionists and a bamboo flute master to perform traditional Hindustani music

In my thirty-odd years as a lover of all kinds of music, I have seen Zakir Hussain perform live four times: twice with Remember Shakti, and twice with Masters of Percussion. On every occasion, the California-based tabla titan has astounded me with the depth and breadth of his musical intelligence: not only his fine attention to detail and his willingness to be a supportive accompanist, nor his wide-ranging curiosity and generosity with international collaborators such as John McLaughlin and fancy-pants Steve Smith, nor his exuberance and pedagogical approach to performance (sometimes giving mini-lessons mid-concert).

What really stayed with me was that Hussain, one of the world’s most renowned musicians, was always trying something new, whether it was some advanced technique or a unique instrument. And of course the global collaborations and conversations continue, most recently with a bunch of my own kin.

Zakir Hussain & Rakesh Chaurasia perform Sunday in Portland.

At this Sunday’s concert at First Congregational Church in downtown Portland, Hussain performs Hindustani classical music with bansuri master Rakesh Chaurasia, nephew of the world-famous bansuri player Hariprasad Chaurasia, with whom Hussain has been playing for decades. Like Hussain, Rakesh has augmented his pursuit of classical excellence with a modern musician’s taste for cross-cultural collaboration. He has recorded with Greek composer Alexandros Hahalis (have a listen to “Firebird”) and a ton of Indian musicians, and even has his own fusion group, Rakesh and Friends (have a listen to their 2013 debut, with its Yes-like closer in seven). His classical playing is, of course, impeccable.

In a phone interview with Hussain and email exchange with Chaurasia, we discussed how they plan a performance, how newcomers might best approach listening to Indian music, and how a concert is really a conversation.

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MusicWatch Weekly: celebrations and appreciations

This week's Oregon concerts celebrate a famous composer's centennial, an Oregon professor's creative  work, early Italian baroque, female composers, and American jazz

The adventurous Portland/Seattle ensemble Sound of Late premieres Book of the Dark by American composer Alan Shockley at their Saturday night informal, hour-long show at Portland’s New Expressive Works. The chamber music score incorporates references to James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake, moody English composer John Dowland’s darkly compelling Lachrimae, occult symbolism, and more.

Sound of Late performs at Portland’s N.E.W. studios Saturday

The intriguing program also includes the still-startling solo flute showcase Diaphonic Suite #1 by one of America’s first great female composers, Ruth Crawford (who later added a husband and a surname, Seeger), a chamber ensemble arrangement of Arvo Part’s choral classic Summa, Argentine composer Adriana Verdié’s Confluencia and Michigan composer Alexander Miller’s Short Stanzas.

Lisa Neher performs Sunday at Lewis & Clark College.

As we noted in the previous MusicWatch, last weekend saw three Portland concerts that featured new music by female composers. This Sunday afternoon, a free recital at Lewis & Clark College’s Agnes Flanagan Chapel offers another. Her Songs: A Recital of Music by Women, features composer, mezzo-soprano and L&C alumna Lisa Neher and pianist Stephanie Thompson performing songs by early 20th century French composers Germaine Tailleferre and Lili Boulanger, California’s Gabriela Lena Frank, Broadway composer / lyricist / conductor Georgia Stitt, and Neher herself.

Since graduating from Lewis & Clark, Neher has built a career as choral performer and vocal recitalist and created One Voice Project, a one-woman performance combining contemporary poetry and new musical works for unaccompanied voice chosen through a call for scores and teaches college in Iowa.

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